ロンドン シティ 空港。 ロンドンの空港

2020 ロンドン・シティ空港 (LCY)に至近のホテル・10選【トリップアドバイザー】

ロンドン シティ 空港

Sources: UK at WAD Statistics from the London City Airport : LCY, : EGLC is an in , England. It is located in the in the , approximately 7 miles 11 km east of the and a shorter distance east of. These are the twin centres of London's financial industry, which is a major user of the airport. The airport was developed by the engineering company in 1986—87. In 2016 it was bought by a Canadian-led of AIMCo , , the and Wren House Infrastructure Management of the. London City Airport has a single 1,508-metre 4,948 ft long runway, and a Public Use Aerodrome Licence Number P728 that allows flights for the public transport of passengers or for flight training but only for training necessary for the operation of aircraft at the airport. Only multi-engine, fixed-wing aircraft with special aircraft and aircrew certification to fly 5. The largest aircraft which can be used at the airport is the , which has been modified with a "steep approach function". London City had over 4. 5 million passenger movements in 2017. It is the fifth-busiest airport by passengers and aircraft movements serving the London area—after , , and —and was the in the UK in 2017. In 2019 the airport handled over 5 million passengers. Contents• History [ ] Proposal and construction [ ] The airport was first proposed in 1981 by , who was Chief Executive of the newly formed LDDC that was responsible for the regeneration of the area. He in turn discussed the proposal with chairman of Sir Philip Beck and the idea of an airport for Docklands was born. By November of that year Mowlem and Bill Bryce of had submitted an outline proposal to the LDDC for a Docklands city centre gateway. Plaque commemorating the landing by Captain Harry Gee at in 1982 On 27 June 1982 Brymon's Captain Harry Gee landed a turboprop aircraft on , in the nearby , in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the STOLport project. Later that year the LDDC published a feasibility study, an opinion poll amongst local residents showed a majority in favour of the development of the airport, and Mowlem submitted an application for. A 63-day started on 6 June 1983. By the middle of the following year, the had indicated that he was "disposed to agree the application", but asked for further details. The brought an action in the to reopen the inquiry. After the High Court dismissed the action in March 1985, outline planning permission was granted in May of that year, followed by the grant of detailed planning permission in early 1986. Construction began on the site shortly after permission was granted, with laying the foundation stone of the building, designed by R Seifert and Partners, on 2 May 1986. The first aircraft landed on 31 May 1987, with the first commercial services operating from 26 October 1987. officially opened London City Airport in November of the same year. Opening and runway extension [ ] In 1988, the first full year of operation, the airport handled 133,000 passengers. The earliest scheduled flights were operated to and from , , and. With a runway of only 1,080 m 3,543 ft in length, and a slope of the of 7. In 1989, the airport submitted a planning application to extend the runway, allowing the use of a larger number of aircraft types. In 1990, the airport handled 230,000 passengers, but the figures fell drastically after the and did not recover until 1993, when 245,000 passengers were carried. By this time the extended runway had been approved and opened on 5 March 1992. At the same time the glide path was reduced to 5. By 1995, passenger numbers reached half a million, and Mowlem sold the airport to Irish businessman. Five years later passenger numbers had climbed to 1,580,000, and over 30,000 flights were operated. In 2002, a jet centre catering to was opened, as well as additional aircraft stands at the western end of the. In 2003, a new ground holding point was established at the eastern end of the runway, enabling aircraft awaiting takeoff to hold there whilst other aircraft landed. Further expansion [ ] making its steep approach to LCY from the west as another DHC-7 prepares to depart to Amsterdam in 1988 On 2 December 2005, opened on a branch of the , providing rail access to the airport for the first time, and providing fast rail links to and the City of London. By 2006, more than 2. 3 million passengers used London City Airport. In October 2006, the airport was purchased from Dermot Desmond by a comprising insurer and GIP. London City Airport was granted planning permission to construct an extended apron with four additional aircraft parking stands and four new gates to the east of the terminal in 2001; they became operational on 30 May 2008. They are carried on piles above the water of the. commenced the first scheduled from the airport in September 2009, with a twice a day service to 's using a specially configured aircraft. The A318 is the smallest airliner to operate since BA's corporate predecessor, , began transatlantic jet flights on 4 October 1958, with the. The first day of the service, one week after of British Airways pledged to the that aviation would deliver deep cuts in carbon emissions, was disrupted by activists from and Fight the Flights dressed up in business suits. During the Games, though, the airport operated only restricted hours and experienced street block closures [ ] for security , and the low capacity ramp and short runway excluded most long-range arrivals. However, it was the closest airport to , with normal scheduled travel by road of 15 minutes. In response to the UK government The Future of Air Transport, the airport operators have produced a master plan outlining their vision for growth up to 2030. The plan was subject to public consultation during spring 2006, and has been republished incorporating comments from this consultation. The master plan shows a phased expansion of the airport, giving the capability of handling 8 million passengers per annum by 2030. It does not propose the addition of a second runway, or significant expansion of the airport boundaries. Phase 1 of this development would be undertaken by 2015. It would include the in-progress construction of the eastern apron extension and provision of a finger pier to the south of this apron to provide passenger access to aircraft using the new parking stands. The terminal building would also be extended to use the triangle of land between it and the railway station. The existing jet centre serving corporate aviation would be extended, a new built to allow aircraft maintenance, and a replacement fire station provided. Phases 2 and 3 would be undertaken between 2015 and 2030. Further aircraft parking stands would be built to the east of the terminal, and a taxiway would be constructed alongside and to the south of the runway, to avoid the need for aircraft to back-track on the runway. Both these developments would involve further reduction in the water area of the King George V Dock. The existing fuel farm would be relocated to a site at the east of the airport, where it could be supplied by , and linked to a hydrant based supply system, thus eliminating both deliveries and on-airport movements. The existing surface car park would be replaced by a , allowing extension of the vehicle drop-off and pick up area. The jet centre and hangar facilities would be further extended. Finally the existing terminal building would be replaced. In line with phase 1 of the master plan, London City Airport made a planning application to the London Borough of Newham in August 2007. This would allow it to increase the number of flights per year from 80,000 to 120,000 by 2010. In July 2008, the Planning Officer for Newham Council produced a report on the Planning Application, recommending that planning permission be granted. The decision was deferred by the Council's Development Control Committee at their meeting on 30 July 2008, following a request from , the , that the decision be delayed until after a study by the National Air Traffic Services NATS has been published. Over 10,000 local residents were consulted by Newham Council over the plan of which 1,109 replied, 801 with objections and 308 in support. The 801 objections mainly concerned increase in noise, increase in air pollution, surface transport, socio-economics and regeneration. The 308 supporters mainly concerned the reduction of air pollution, an alternative London and 2012 Olympic gateway, additional jobs, and benefiting to the local economy. The residents campaign group HACAN East formerly Fight the Flights is opposed to expansion due to noise and pollution issues. On 20 January 2010, the challenge was dismissed, and a deadline of 14 days to appeal was set. The plan was given the go-ahead in February 2015. However this was overturned by Boris Johnson in March 2015. The sale was completed on 10 March 2016. In September 2016, British Airways announced the termination of one of its two daily long-haul all-business class services from the airport to New York City, citing economic reasons. The decision was taken to relocate the control tower to a site 80 miles 130 km away at , utilising three cable links providing live video which will be a UK first by relocating air traffic controllers to a remotely operated digital control room. It is scheduled to be completed in 2018 before being tested for a year, becoming operational in 2019. Green Party closure and redevelopment proposal [ ] candidate for the , , proposed the closure and redevelopment of London City airport. Her reasons included the relatively low profit from such a large amount of land, high demand for housing in , and "untold health and environmental problems to thousands of local residents". Berry also argued that given the four million passengers that use London City Airport every year represents a small portion of London's overall air capacity, that this could easily be absorbed by other London airports - particularly Heathrow, given that once was completed, there would be a fast link between it and. Berry's proposals did not receive support from any other party. Operations [ ] Apron and runway overview Owing to its proximity to London's Docklands and financial district its main users are business travellers, but the number of leisure destinations served like , or has increased in recent years. London City is at its busiest during the winter months, when a number of airlines, most notably British Airways and Swiss, fly to gateway destinations. Due to the airport's proximity to Central London, it has stringent rules imposed to limit the noise impact from aircraft operations. This, together with the physical dimensions of the 1,508 m 4,948 ft long runway and the steep glideslope, limits the aircraft types that can use London City Airport. Mid-range airliners seen at London City include the both and variants , , , , , , , , and. On 30 January 2009, trials were completed successfully with the , leading to its approval for use at the airport. The SR underwent trials from 28 March 2009, and thereafter gained approval. The , , and also have approval for scheduled operations at the airport. A number of airlines including and have ordered the with the intention of operating it from London City once delivered and approved. A220-100 operations for Swiss from City commenced in late 2017. On 22—23 March 2017, the A220-100 completed tests for the 5. 5-degree approach in Wichita and Salina, Kansas. The A220-100 was certified for the steep approach landing for London City in April 2017. Corporate aircraft such as the , series, , , and variants of the are increasingly common. The airport is not available for use by single-engine aircraft or helicopters; recreational flights and single-pilot operations are also not permitted. The size and layout of the airport and overall complexity caused by the lack of mean that the airport gets very busy during peak hours. The have to deal with over 38 flights an hour on a runway requiring a lengthy backtrack for each aircraft needing to depart from runway 27 or land on runway 09. Operations are restricted to 06:30 to 22:30 Monday to Friday, 06:30 to 13:00 on Saturdays and 12:30 to 22:30 on Sundays. These restrictions are related to noise. The size of the airport, constrained by the water-filled and docks to the north and south respectively, also means that there are no covered maintenance facilities for aircraft. The airport was envisaged for use as a by. Terminal [ ] With space limited in the London Docklands area, and comparatively low passenger volumes, London City Airport is small compared with several other airports serving London, such as , , and. The airport has a single, two-storey passenger terminal building. The ground floor contains the check-in desks and some service facilities as well as a staircase leading to the security control on the upper level, after which the airside waiting area and several more shops can be found. The waiting area is connected to piers on both sides where corridors on the upper floor lead to the departure gates on the ground level. As the airport has no , walk-boarding is used on all stands. Airlines and destinations [ ] The following airlines operate regular services to and from London City Airport: Airlines Destinations , , , , , , , , , , , ends 13 September 2020 , , , , , , , , , , , Seasonal: , , , , , , , , , , , , British Airways flights from London City to include a fuel stop at due to weight restrictions on departure from LCY. The stop is also used for US Customs and Border Protection pre-clearance, meaning that passengers arriving in New York do not need to go through immigration there. It is however not possible to buy a ticket solely for the London City to Shannon sector. Statistics [ ] Passengers [ ] Passenger numbers at London City Airport saw rapid growth between 2003 and 2008, doubling from around 1. 5 million per year to over 3 million. Totals declined in 2009 and 2010, but have since recovered and in 2019 over 5,1 million passengers passed through London City. When the new Elizabeth line comes into service in 2021, its route will pass very close to London City Airport but there are no plans for a station at the airport. Proposals have been put forward that a new station should be opened on the new Elizabeth line to serve the airport; TfL has not included a City Airport station in its plans. Road access [ ] The airport is served by the and the. These give fast links to , the and , as well as connecting to the and the. Also the A13 provides easy access to the , as with the A406 connecting to the. The airport has both a short-term and a long-term car park, both within walking distance of the terminal and a taxi rank outside the terminal door. Local buses [ ] The airport is served by services:• to via and• to and via and The express shuttle buses, which formerly ran to various destinations, were withdrawn after the DLR line was built. Riverboat [ ] services will call to a new wharf being built at nearby residential development Royal Wharf, allowing travel into Central London using an or. Accidents and incidents [ ]• On 13 February 2009, BA CityFlyer Flight 8456 an , registered G-BXAR, flying from suffered a collapse while landing at London City. None of the 67 passengers or five crew members were seriously injured in the incident, but three passengers suffered minor injuries; two of them were kept in hospital overnight. The aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair, and was written off by insurers in May 2009. On 21 October 2016, 27 people were injured, two of them seriously, when a substance was released in London City Airport. Hundreds of other passengers reported experiencing temporary blindness and Many flights were cancelled, leaving thousands stranded and causing major disruption around Europe. A few days later, police arrested a suspect under 'terror offences' and the media referred to the incident as a terror attack. Police later confirmed that tear gas bottles had deliberately been placed to 'cause harm or disruption'. Security was increased at the airport in the days following the attack. See also [ ]• References [ ]• PDF. UK Civil Aviation Authority. 1 January 2019. Archived from PDF on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019. PDF. UK Civil Aviation Authority. 1 January 2019. Archived from PDF on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019. Nats-uk. ead-it. com. Retrieved 7 April 2012. World Aero Data. WorldAeroData. com. Retrieved 2 March 2020. 16 March 2018. from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 21 March 2018. BBC News. 26 February 2016. from the original on 28 February 2016. Retrieved 26 February 2016. Nats-uk. ead-it. com. Retrieved 29 August 2013. Isle of Man Aircraft Registry. Archived from PDF on 14 September 2011. Retrieved 22 January 2011. Wallsworth, Dave 7 November 2017. Captain Dave. Archived from on 13 January 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2019. London City Airport Consultative Committee. Archived from on 3 March 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2008. London City Airport Consultative Committee. Archived from on 28 October 2007. Retrieved 2 January 2008. 22 August 2010 at the• PDF. London City Airport. November 2006. Archived from PDF on 27 February 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2008. Flightglobal. com. 27 May 2009. from the original on 1 June 2009. Retrieved 7 April 2012. The Independent. 26 September 2009. from the original on 29 September 2009. Retrieved 26 September 2009. The Guardian. from the original on 25 October 2009. Retrieved 22 October 2009. Candm. from the original on 10 January 2014. Retrieved 7 March 2014. Jason Hayward 16 January 2012. Universalweather. com. from the original on 10 January 2014. Retrieved 7 March 2014. "London City Airport", Airliner World: 7, February 2013• London City Airport. Archived from on 3 March 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2008. London City Airport. November 2006. 24—26. Archived from PDF on 27 February 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2008. London City Airport. Archived from on 2 January 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2008. London Borough of Newham. Retrieved 2 July 2008. BBC. 30 July 2008. Retrieved 12 August 2008. BBC. 29 September 2009. Retrieved 29 September 2009. BBC News. 20 January 2011. from the original on 13 November 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. BBC News. 7 February 2015. from the original on 14 November 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. BBC News. 27 March 2015. from the original on 13 November 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. "City Airport on the Market". Airliner World: 6. October 2015. PDF. Global Infrastructure Partners. 26 February 2016. PDF from the original on 1 March 2016. Retrieved 26 February 2016. Businesstraveller. com. 31 August 2016. from the original on 14 January 2018. Retrieved 2 June 2017. BBC News. 19 May 2017. from the original on 22 August 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. Sian Berry 18 January 2016. from the original on 7 July 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2019. Flightsnetwork. Archived from on 18 February 2012. Retrieved 7 April 2012. Aviation Today. 22 June 2007. Archived from on 5 March 2008. Retrieved 3 January 2008. Flightglobal. from the original on 14 February 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2010. Ghim-Lay Yeo 2 June 2013. Flightglobal. from the original on 25 June 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2013. Ghim-Lay Yeo 17 June 2013. Flightglobal. from the original on 27 April 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2013. Kraft, Melanie 28 March 2017. Airlive. from the original on 31 March 2017. Retrieved 1 April 2017. from the original on 9 July 2019. Retrieved 9 July 2019. CS1 maint: archived copy as title• www. london-city-airport-guide. from the original on 24 May 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2015. retrieved 1 February 2020• Number of passengers including both domestic and international. Number of movements represents total aircraft takeoffs and landings during that year. PDF. UK Civil Aviation Authority. 1 January 2019. Archived from PDF on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019. UK Civil Aviation Authority. 3 March 2018. Tables 12. 1 XLS and 12. 2 XLS. from the original on 13 March 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2019. Simons, Graham; Bowman, Martin W. 2011. Casemate Publishers. 132. from the original on 19 September 2018. Retrieved 19 September 2018. 5 July 2015 at the - Crossrail Ltd. January 2012• from the original on 20 March 2017. Retrieved 28 November 2015. Broadbent, Giles 31 May 2016. The Wharf. InYourArea. from the original on 19 September 2018. Retrieved 19 September 2018. PDF. London City Airport. Archived from PDF on 26 January 2017. Retrieved 1 April 2018. from the original on 12 January 2019. Retrieved 11 January 2019. CS1 maint: archived copy as title• Aaib. gov. 13 February 2009. from the original on 8 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2016. BBC News. 25 May 2009. from the original on 1 September 2017. Retrieved 8 April 2016. The Independent. 24 October 2016. Retrieved 18 December 2016. External links [ ] Media related to at Wikimedia Commons•

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ロンドン・シティー空港[ロンドン・シティー・エアポート]

ロンドン シティ 空港

CONTENTS/目次• ロンドン近郊6つの空港 ロンドン近郊には6つもの空港があります。 なおかつ各空港から市内への交通手段も豊富です。 特に電車。 ロンドン交通網を理解するキーは、 市内中心部にある幾つかの主要ターミナル駅を把握することです。 ロンドンには、いわゆる「ロンドン駅」なる中心駅が存在しません。 代わりに13のターミナル駅 (*1)があり、その各ターミナル駅からそれぞれの地方へと路線が伸びています。 これは、鉄道各社が自社の都合でロンドン市内の適当な場所から地方へと線路を作っていったという経緯によるもの。 そのため、どの駅を目指すのかきちんと把握していないと、電車で空港からロンドン市内へ向かうのも複雑になってしまいます。 日本からの直行便があるのは、ヒースロー空港のみです。 各運営会社公式の情報(2018年8月現在)を極力掲載していますが、そうでない場合もあります。 時期や乗車時間によって運賃が、また当日の交通状況などによって所要時間が異なりますので、 あくまで「目安」としてご参考ください。 各ルートの公式の情報元のリンクをつけていますので、詳細については必ずそちらで確認をお願いします。 間違った情報がありましたらその都度訂正をしますので、こちらまで()ご指摘をいただければ幸いです。 2018年12月に開業予定のCrossrail(Elizabeth Line)に組み込まれる予定です。 00〜 バ ス 【A6】(Paddington駅) 【A7】Victoria Coach Sta. 90〜 バ ス 【A1】Victoria Coach Sta. - 46,551 views• - 23,189 views• - 23,032 views• - 21,012 views• - 18,816 views• - 13,077 views• - 12,156 views• - 11,877 views• - 11,702 views• - 11,457 views• - 9,898 views• - 9,702 views• - 9,693 views• - 9,677 views• - 9,577 views• - 9,004 views• - 8,777 views• - 8,510 views• - 8,502 views• - 8,484 views• - 8,067 views• - 8,033 views• - 7,961 views• - 7,883 views• - 7,490 views• - 7,325 views• - 7,234 views• - 7,198 views• - 7,055 views• - 6,684 views.

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ロンドン旅行の前にチェック!6つの国際空港どれが便利?

ロンドン シティ 空港

ホテル タイプ別• ホテル クラス別• ホテル・ブランド• 人気の設備・サービス• 人気の周辺施設• ロンドンの人気カテゴリ• 観光スポット周辺• 鉄道駅周辺• 空港周辺• 大学周辺•

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